Classroom Notes – Primary Program

December 2014
Carrie Irre

My November letter received plenty of positive feedback. If you remember, I grouped the ages of children and gave some examples of what one might observe in the class from children in those age groups
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During the latter part of this past week I was working on a bank game addition lesson with a group of three boys, Alec, Michael, and Gabriel. Uli and Isaac were observing the lesson and assisting with some trading (ten units to tens, ten tens to one hundred, etc.) Although all the boys were participating, Gabriel was my target recipient of the lesson to practice bank game addition. At one point Gabriel was asked to read his number in order to verify his quantity, which he did. Independently. He said, “Two thousand, four hundred, six tens, and five units.” Michael, with a big smile, stuck out his hand for Gabriel to shake in order to congratulate him for his success. In my little notebook I wrote, “Special Moments” and wrote that scenario down sparking the creation of this month’s news, Special Moments.

Uli, Michael, and Alec hopping to the wall (three times) after reading the Phonogram Command Card, hop to the wall. (What could be more fun in a class than to be granted permission to hop?)

Alli pulling out three handwriting papers from her drawer to point out to me the improvement she has noted after deciding to put her best effort into it. Commendable work.

Natalie proudly carrying the thousand chain, perfectly prepared to hang up. It was perhaps her third time completing this work during the week.

Jennifer completing the Pythagoras Board with Natalie – at a distance. They needed a bit of help so we figured out a system where they would come to me to count and go back across the room to find the tile. This elementary level material was purchased from earned bakery money last school year when we had so many children who were able to complete it (from practicing those number chains so much).

Alec, after a presentation with the Subtraction Strip Board, says, “This is fun.” “I wanna finish this today.” (18 pages with various amounts of simple equations from 18 – 9 =, to 1 – 1 =) And he finished!, in a little over an hour, smiling all the way.

Carson perfecting his writing grip and already writing cursive letters after just starting with us this fall. Way to go, Carson.

Luke reading to Buttercup and Miss Pam on Books and Barks day and being so gentle with the dog.

Alexa giving Sydney a lesson with the spindle box. It could have been me giving the lesson – she knew every nuance of the presentation. Really.

Isaac walking on the line, marching on the line, walking on tip toe on the line. His smile was from ear to ear.

Zea, when asked how she liked her first puzzle map drawing said, “It came out just like I wanted it to!” Commendable work.

Audrey assisting Ms. Irwin to set up lunch. Placemats, chairs, napkins, etc. all just where they needed to be.

Danielle working with the puzzle map of USA and handling the pieces so gently. She organized them all into color and they all fit perfectly on the mat.

Ava grinning as she finished up her first puzzle map. Zea gave her the lesson. Commendable work.

Easton sounding out words and listening carefully for the end sounds while working with the Movable Alphabet.

Lexi completing the five cubed chain on her own. I haven’t had to show Lexi any number chains, Natalie and Alli take care of that!

Gregory laying out all the botany cabinet cards and finding the proper shapes at a distance. Fun and commendable work.

Cadence giving Amelia a lesson with the trinomial cube. Cadence wasn’t sure she could do it, but with a little reassurance that I would be in close proximity took it on gracefully and presented the lesson with confidence.

Sydney hunched over the countries of Central America focused on building the North America puzzle map. She completed it independently.

Julien at a table building the fish puzzle outside the frame. Content and concentrated.

Max working with his first Movable Alphabet. (His special moment was hard to choose, I loved the conversation that ended with, “When I grow up I’m going to be a builder and build with my Dad.”).

Riley, when asked to hang up my sweater prior to working together with the Red Rods, took it to the coat closet instead of my peg, put the sweater on the floor and buttoned all eight buttons to hang it up. Priceless watching him hunched over my sweater and concentrating so hard to help me.

Bristol polishing the arms and rungs of the rocking chair with wood polish. It looked shiny when she finished.

Gavin and his first Movable Alphabet. He couldn’t wait to write “motrsicl”.

Wiley bringing my stool to me so I am comfortable when presenting lessons to children. He does this often. Gallant.

Amelia building the trinomial cube with only one or two prompts. (Cadence is an excellent teacher.)

Niko focused and happy with Sound Cylinders. They are so much fun to shake and match.

This is the life Beth and I lead every day. Interacting with, observing and enjoying the successes of your children. We love our special moments.

Carrie

P.S. Our current wish list did not make it into the last Newsflash. We are hopeful for the following:
Disinfecting wipes (ongoing wish)
Cleaning help in the afternoons from 1:30 on (during or after school). Dusting, disinfecting materials, sweeping, washing, etc. in preparation for the Holidays Around the World celebration and simply because it gets dusty this time of year.
Parent to volunteer to wash mats once a month starting in January.
As a fun addition to our class we have begun looking at pictures of different kinds of evergreen boughs. It would be fun to have you snip small branches and tape them onto 3X5 cards so we can match and identify the kinds of pines they came from. They can be from your Christmas trees or feel free to get adventurous and clip from trees in your yard or places you visit. Have a good week!


 

October 2014
Carrie Irre

October is bursting with activity. The hum of learning is all around us.

The youngest of our group is involved in forming friendships, practical life such as learning to use a hanger and zip or snap their coat, put on their shoes, gather their belongings, sit in a group, play a sound game, match color tablets and learn the names of plane shapes from our geometry cabinet. All this is done while each child works through their own special circumstances: overcoming separation, asking for help when needed, remembering to use the potty, controlling movement or impulse, waiting…

The middle group, those approaching or just having turned four, are involved in all those things plus: taking what they know and applying it to bigger things. Letters traced on sandpaper begin to appear on chalkboards and morph into words on a moveable alphabet, graces and courtesies learned become habit… walking in class, handling materials in a careful manner, storing belongings and getting down to the tasks of learning. Counting turns into work with the golden beads, the binomial cube can be built in or out of the box, plane shapes can be traced, cut and glued on a poster, paintings actually look like something and can be described with rich language.

The oldest group, those morphing into those children I think each year I won’t be able to live without when they leave for elementary class, have competencies one would not expect of five-year-olds. All the things from the first two years now become second nature and these children tie shoes for others, sweep up, model graceful movement and more-careful care of materials. They move throughout the class exploring materials (sometimes with a blindfold on), write letters, stories, their own name. These children are perfecting the ability to read simple words, sometimes sentences, sometimes books. Counting expands into the use of numbers for adding, subtracting, multiplying or dividing. The work becomes longer and more complex and requires great concentration.

I encourage you to come in and see this world in person. Call the office to set up a time to observe, sign up to bake with our class on Tuesday mornings, attend parent education meetings and become part of our PTO, attend our special activities such as picnics and fall festivals. Sign up for a parent teacher conference, purchase something from our bakery, come in and see what the school store has to offer. Come in and read the leaves depicting the acts of kindness already performed. It is all inspiring.

We are fortunate to have our small community of Mountain Laurel. I am thankful for my place here each and every day.


 

March 2014
Carrie Irre

Hopefully the snowy weather is behind us now. It has been quite a winter! The good news is the children have had an enormous amount of practice with all aspects of storing their belongings… zipping, snapping, using a hanger, donning and doffing coats, snow-pants, boots, etc. I must say I am not sad to be looking forward to spring. We had a large group of children dissecting flowers early this week, looking at language cards naming the parts of the flower, reading definition booklets defining the parts of the flower with some children making a poster of flower parts and some building the flower puzzle.

I am astonished with the student’s growth and we have had the pleasure of adding a few new students to our class both young and old (for a primary student). Gavin Cosby and Max Longworth joined us in January (as I may have mentioned) and Abigale Hathoway recently joined us for the last few months of school prior to joining our elementary class in the fall. Please welcome the Cosby, Longworth and Hathaway families to our school community now that the dust (or snow) has settled. Their children have helped to round out our class and leave no empty spaces around our rug when we sing.

The five-year-old children have recently finished listening to the novel Little House on the Prairie, by Laura Ingalls Wilder. This series is historical fiction and gives the children a nice introduction into some of the adventures of early settlers in our country. We have had many assistants cutting t-shirt yarn and are hopeful to have a visiting art teacher assist us with a wagon wheel weaving project in the near future. Some family circumstances impacted her schedule, but we will hopefully get to the project once some time has passed. I thank all volunteers who helped cut yarn and will still accept any old t-shirts you can donate. Angelika Swift baked cornbread as part of our baking-with-children volunteer program as follow up to this novel. We are hopeful to get our morning baking routine in swing again to give half-day students opportunity to bake and share treats with their classmates. If you are available any Tuesday mornings please let me know and we can get you signed up to volunteer.

The next cultural study will be the study of Mexico. Erika Marce (mother of Joaquin Suzan) has begun a study of Mexico with us. Our first lesson centered on Mexico City which is where the Suzan family lives. We have many future activities planned including a study of the Mexican flag, Mexican celebrations (including constructing a pinata), study of ecosystems – especially the rain-forest and plants and animals that live there. Mrs. Baumgart’s class is studying Russia. Angelika Swift (parent of Sophia Swift) will share her time and talents with Mrs. Baumgart’s class and join ours for a bit of insight into Russia. Around the world in Mrs. Irre’s class!!

Please join us Wednesday evening, February 26th for a Parent Education meeting. We will be summarizing my favorite parenting book titled Simplicity Parenting, My guess is it will be a fabulous meeting and following that our PTO will be having a meeting where, among other things, we will talk about our upcoming auction. Mary Bell has been diligently assisting us with a fabulous sewing/art project that is sure to please all. I also have a few other projects that I would like to do for our auction if anyone is interested in talking to me about plans.

Be sure to watch your calendar: early dismissal on Friday to prepare for Dr. Stixrud’s presentation on Saturday, the auction planning meeting on March 2 at 2PM at the Winery, the Kindergarten retention meeting on the 4th at 3:30 (which we urge all primary parents to attend).

And on a last note I would like to tell you about Books and Barks. Books and Barks is a fabulous community organization that started volunteering at MLMS for the Mentorship summer program. The ladies and therapy dogs loved the school so much they now come to the classroom to read with children twice a month during the school year too. The reading inspiration this evokes in all children no matter what their reading or pre reading level is admirable. The youngest kids may trace letters, look at alphabet books, or show their letter booklets to the specially trained team of dog and therapist. The older children may read simple words, sentences, books, phonograms or puzzle words. Books and Barks is a highlight in our schedule twice a month and we appreciate the ladies and their dogs volunteering with us.

Note also on your calendar it is observation season. Please schedule a morning or afternoon to observe the class!

Carrie Irre
Mountain Laurel Montessori School
(540) 636-4257 (work)


 

February 2014
Carrie Irre 

Hopefully the snowy weather is behind us now. It has been quite a winter! The good news is the children have had an enormous amount of practice with all aspects of storing their belongings… zipping, snapping, using a hanger, donning and doffing coats, snow-pants, boots, etc. I must say I am not sad to be looking forward to spring. We had a large group of children dissecting flowers early this week, looking at language cards naming the parts of the flower, reading definition booklets defining the parts of the flower with some children making a poster of flower parts and some building the flower puzzle.

I am astonished with the student’s growth and we have had the pleasure of adding a few new students to our class both young and old (for a primary student). Gavin Cosby and Max Longworth joined us in January (as I may have mentioned) and Abigale Hathoway recently joined us for the last few months of school prior to joining our elementary class in the fall. Please welcome the Cosby, Longworth and Hathaway families to our school community now that the dust (or snow) has settled. Their children have helped to round out our class and leave no empty spaces around our rug when we sing.

The five-year-old children have recently finished listening to the novel Little House on the Prairie, by Laura Ingalls Wilder. This series is historical fiction and gives the children a nice introduction into some of the adventures of early settlers in our country. We have had many assistants cutting t-shirt yarn and are hopeful to have a visiting art teacher assist us with a wagon wheel weaving project in the near future. Some family circumstances impacted her schedule, but we will hopefully get to the project once some time has passed. I thank all volunteers who helped cut yarn and will still accept any old t-shirts you can donate. Angelika Swift baked cornbread as part of our baking-with-children volunteer program as follow up to this novel. We are hopeful to get our morning baking routine in swing again to give half-day students opportunity to bake and share treats with their classmates. If you are available any Tuesday mornings please let me know and we can get you signed up to volunteer.

The next cultural study will be the study of Mexico. Erika Marce (mother of Joaquin Suzan) has begun a study of Mexico with us. Our first lesson centered on Mexico City which is where the Suzan family lives. We have many future activities planned including a study of the Mexican flag, Mexican celebrations (including constructing a pinata), study of ecosystems – especially the rain-forest and plants and animals that live there. Mrs. Baumgart’s class is studying Russia. Angelika Swift (parent of Sophia Swift) will share her time and talents with Mrs. Baumgart’s class and join ours for a bit of insight into Russia. Around the world in Mrs. Irre’s class!!

Please join us Wednesday evening, February 26th for a Parent Education meeting. We will be summarizing my favorite parenting book titled Simplicity Parenting, My guess is it will be a fabulous meeting and following that our PTO will be having a meeting where, among other things, we will talk about our upcoming auction. Mary Bell has been diligently assisting us with a fabulous sewing/art project that is sure to please all. I also have a few other projects that I would like to do for our auction if anyone is interested in talking to me about plans.

Be sure to watch your calendar: early dismissal on Friday to prepare for Dr. Stixrud’s presentation on Saturday, the auction planning meeting on March 2 at 2PM at the Winery, the Kindergarten retention meeting on the 4th at 3:30 (which we urge all primary parents to attend).

And on a last note I would like to tell you about Books and Barks. Books and Barks is a fabulous community organization that started volunteering at MLMS for the Mentorship summer program. The ladies and therapy dogs loved the school so much they now come to the classroom to read with children twice a month during the school year too. The reading inspiration this evokes in all children no matter what their reading or pre reading level is admirable. The youngest kids may trace letters, look at alphabet books, or show their letter booklets to the specially trained team of dog and therapist. The older children may read simple words, sentences, books, phonograms or puzzle words. Books and Barks is a highlight in our schedule twice a month and we appreciate the ladies and their dogs volunteering with us.

Note also on your calendar it is observation season. Please schedule a morning or afternoon to observe the class!

Carrie Irre
Mountain Laurel Montessori School
(540) 636-4257 (work)


 

December 2013
Carrie Irre 

Dear Parents,

With the Thanksgiving holiday coming to a close it is the time of year that we look forward to Christmas and all the hustle bustle that comes with it. In the next two-and-a-half weeks we will continue our classroom routine as normal as possible in order to offer as much consistency as possible prior to the winter holidays. It is an exciting time in class with the added accents of winter-themed art lessons and sewing, holiday songs, and the new addition of the Irre Children’s Bakery.

The Kindergarten children have begun learning about the American Flag and the Pledge of Allegiance. We will review and/or learn the words to the Star Spangled Banner and the story of Betsy Ross. A volunteer artist will be coming in to do some wagon-wheel weaving with us in the next two weeks as we talk about the expansion of the early pioneers westward. The kindergarten-aged children reaped some rewards from our creative writing group – all of our Kindergarten students wrote lovely winter or Christmas-themed stories to submit to the Samuel’s Library writing contest. Although all the stories were creative and quite impressive for young writers, two were chosen from our class as place winners in the contest. I think the winners were chosen in part because the young authors tapped into their family traditions for their inspiration. Don’t ever underestimate all the simple traditions of family life. In the long run those are the most important. That being said I would like to recommend a book entitled Simplicity Parenting, Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids by, Kim John Payne, M. ED. It was brought to my attention by Mrs. Glier who featured the book for a parent education meeting. I am currently reading the book and, from both a personal and professional perspective, gaining much insight. It is the perfect time to read it prior to holiday shopping – simplify is the message to be taken away!

Our classroom is thriving. Your children are growing in every way – emotionally, developmentally, and academically. I am astounded each day at their level of competence. If the world outside the Montessori classroom knew the capabilities of small children they would be astonished. When the volunteer from Books and Barks visits every other week she always comments upon the ease with which children are allowed to learn – each at their own pace and level.

The Children’s Bakery will be featuring Crustless Cranberry Pie as our sale item prior to Christmas. We will be producing the pies at varied intervals over the next two weeks and using cinnamon pecans the bakery purchased from the Nut N Better sale. The half-day students will be involved to a certain extent, but the extended-day students do the predominance of work toward our bakery. People often don’t think of the educational benefits of baking with children. The hand skills involved include children cracking eggs (even separating eggs if you can imagine), holding the hand-held mixer without any support from me, using carrot peelers, apple cutters, etc. Reading, vocabulary building, fractions, geometry (scones are made up of right-angled scalene or isosceles triangles – did you know??), handwriting, and the usage of oral story problems are worked in to each baking experience (the cake calls for 5 eggs, we put in 2, how many more are needed??). So thank you for all the support we have gotten from you parents – purchases, donations, and support – it is all appreciated. The next donation we will be looking for outside of all the regular baking items is fresh cranberries if you are so inclined. Thank you!!

It was a pleasure meeting with all of you for parent teacher conferences. Although our formal observation period is over please do not let that inhibit you from coming in to observe a morning or afternoon session. We welcome you. The language fair was sparsely attended due to the holiday and the predicted weather complications, but those who were able to attend seemed to enjoy themselves. Children had wonderful lessons planned for parents including language card lessons and sound games, sandpaper letter tracing, reading words, writing sentences with movable alphabets, reading sentences, showing handwriting work, the language of math – counting to one hundred in English and Spanish, science language, etc. Language comes in many forms.

Tuesday, the 3rd, is Visitor’s Day if you have any friends who would like to come in and see our program in action. Visitor’s day culminates with lunch with teachers and the head of school, Mona Nixon. It is a great way to get questions answered by a wide array of professionals.

Winter Holidays Around the World will be on the 17th. This is a PTO sponsored event and one the community loves. I look forward to it and will see you there if you are able.

Sincerely,
Carrie

Carrie Irre
Mountain Laurel Montessori School
(540) 636-4257 (work)


March 2013

Carrie Irre 

Dear Parents,

The sun is shining today and resembling the weather we are expecting for spring. Hopefully this remaining snow will be short-lived and the crocuses, daffodils and tulips will be able to stand tall soon.

The news from our class is plentiful. Prior to spring break we learned that the primary classes successfully collected books for our auction from a list of One Hundred Top Children’s Books of all time. Thank you to all who donated books and especially thank you to the ladies who made it possible: Katie Bradley (mother of Alexa Bradley), Jenn Forrester (mother of Zea Forrester), and Virginia Lohr (mother of Isabelle Lohr). These ladies worked very hard to secure these book donations and I am grateful for their energy. Meg DeMato (mother of Michael DeMato) has been busy working with children to decorate the book storage bags. The project is coming to closure just in time for our April auction. Both primary classes also will add a collective project to auction. Come and check it out!

Our school is undergoing some exciting renovations in the main building over the break! We are enhancing security by opening up the Primary foyer area and combining the space with the office. The children’s storage cubbies are moving into the classrooms. Prior to break we moved shelves and emptied the area where the cubbies and new coat closet will be in order to orient the children to the pending change. We explained to the children that the cubbies and coats are being moved into their classes for convenience and ease of access. The students are very excited by this idea and agree that it will be very helpful to the classes.

Please note that coats will now be hung on hangers.  Be sure to mark your child’s name in their coats and all other items they bring to school (sweater, hats, etc.).

As always, please do not hesitate to let me know if you have any questions about our new arrangement. Have a great spring break!

Sincerely,
Carrie

Carrie Irre
Mountain Laurel Montessori School
cdirre@comcast.net


 

January 2013
Carrie Irre 

Dear Parents,

Despite the cold weather January is such a wonderful month in the primary class. The children come back from the hubbub of the Christmas holidays and, like me, settle right back in to the familiar routine of the classroom with such happiness. Although we started a new student when we returned (welcome Ava Adams who has come to us from the Toddler community), the rest of the students are so familiar with the class that we have picked up right where we left off.

Each student in the class has specific lessons they may be focusing on. When you come in to observe (soon, I hope), you will notice the children who are working to perfect their cutting grasp or their pencil grasp. You will notice those who are sounding out words…practicing tying…mastering a sensorial lesson…learning to work well with others…to push in a chair…to remember to use the potty…to stand in line…to dance or sing at group time. Each and every one of us in the class has goals we are working to achieve, yes, including Beth Irwin and I. We all work as a community of learners. We enjoyed VIP day and you got to hear the students singing. I would like to remind you all of the connections between spoken and written literacy and the time one spends singing, dancing, learning nursery rhymes, and playing.

I recently spent a day at a lecture with a Neurologist named Dr. William Stixrud. He was speaking on the topic of Executive Functioning – the processes we as humans use to regulate, control and manage other cognitive processes, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, verbal reasoning, inhibition, mental flexibility, task switching, and initiation and the monitoring of actions. The message I took from the six-hour workshop was simple: Sleep helps everything and children need to play a lot to become good learners. He did not have time to cover nutrition, but a book I am reading, What’s Eating Your Child, by Kelly Dorfman, MS. LND, speaks to nutrition and how it aids or detracts from learning. The book is fantastic and has an exceptional section addressing picky eaters. So to optimize your child’s learning at school remember all the basics: sleep, nutrition, and play!

We also have many fun activities in our afternoon session. The cultural studies group (which includes all children five and older from both primary classes) have just finished a read-aloud novel,  Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder. We began the novel following some early history of the United States of America. It is a lovely series and the historical fiction provides great opportunities to talk about the past. The descriptions in the novels are very informative and the children delight in the visualizations. I highly recommend to parents of five and six-year-olds that they continue with the next novel in the series, Little House on the Prairie. This past week we read about Martin Luther King and this up-coming week we will delve into some science concepts learning about our senses.

Friday afternoons the four and five-year-old students have begun working with reading buddies from the elementary class. This is a great opportunity to inspire reading in all forms. Some young elementary students visit and provide inspiration to young readers by reading a story to the young-reader and also allowing the young readers to read to them. This offers a bit of incentive to read and also any help that may be needed. We also dance and do some brain gym during this time and I explain to the children that dancing and playing make people better readers. Think about it….

Thank you to all who have provided snacks and flowers to our classroom and fulfilled many wish-list items. Thanks to Meghan Lanterman who provides an additional set of eyes during our early dismissal play time. It is so nice of you to volunteer your time, Megan. To the ladies and gentlemen who assisted with VIP set up, clean up, and our delicious pot luck lunch, thank you. For apron sewing, curtain sewing, napkin sewing, booklet making, baking, mat washing, classroom cleaning, etc., thank you very much to all of you who give in so many ways. In that spirit I have an idea for our class donation to the spring auction. It is a good one, but will require some organizing. If you are interested please call or send me a response to this letter.

Come and observe soon!

Sincerely,
Carrie

Carrie Irre
Mountain Laurel Montessori School
cdirre@comcast.net


 

November 2012
Carrie Irre 

Hello Parents,

November – whoosh – come and gone like the leaves falling from the trees. It has been a wonderful month for our class, full of learning and children’s growing independence. Obviously with the onset of colder weather we are naturally practicing new skills. Many three and fouryear-olds have been practicing how to put a zipper together or button a jacket, taking those dressing frame skills and applying them to real life. A new practical-life lesson is on the shelf, a pair of gloves stored in a box for children to practice putting fingers and thumb in during calm work time when there is no rush to get in line for outdoor activities.

This growing independence is very rewarding for children, offering the best in self-esteem building, as well as helping to strengthen their fine-motor skills.

We have welcomed two new students this past month, Zea Forrester has joined us all the way from California and Kherington Millar joined our class this past week. Please take a moment and welcome these families to our wonderful school.

Spanish lessons are much-loved and Senora Ahern’s visits are fun! It is common now to hear children singing a little song about colors or naming fruits or animals in spanish. Cultural studies class with five and six-year-olds has evolved; we recite the Pledge of Allegiance to our flag each day, we have worked a bit on learning the Fifty Nifty United States song and spent some time talking about the Pilgrims and their travels to the new world. The thirteen colonies have been discussed as well as the first Thanksgiving. Powhattan and Pochahontas stories were told, too. We have just begun reading Little House in the Big Woods, by, Laura Ingalls Wilder. This is a novel in the Little House series and fits in well with history. The children are learning about pioneer life on the U.S. frontier and how different it was to modern day.

Holidays Around the World will be here before we know it and the hustle and bustle of the  season is upon us. We will be crafting, singing and acting our way through the next few weeks  (along with our daily lessons) and enjoying each day. Two of our students, Lela Masters and Louden Schucker, along with a Kindergarten student from Sandy Baumgart and Kara Draper’s class, Christopher Tennett, have placed as the top three winners of the library writing contest this school year. We are very proud of them and will celebrate with them on December 19th at the library. Their work, and the writing and art work of several of our elementary students at MLMS, will be part of the writing magazine published by the library each winter. Each of these Kindergarten students are in the culminating stage of the primary Montessori language lessons; remember each and every child is on that continuum whether it be playing sound games and tracing sandpaper letters, writing cursive letters on a chalkboard and doing moveable alphabet work, or writing stories and playing reading and grammar games in class.

Primary Conversations will be held on Monday at 9AM in the Laurel Club room. The topic is  Children and Choice-making. Please join us if you are able for an informal get-together and  discussion.

If anyone is interested in raking some leaves with students on Tuesday, Colleen Hencken will be doing some raking mid-morning. Let me know! A big thank you to all of you parents who have  been doing behind-the-scene things to help our class and school. You are always appreciated!

Sincerely,
Carrie Irre

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